yYAXssKCQaUWZcXZ79RJTBLvo-c;SfREtjZ9NYeQnnVMC-CsZ9qN6L0 Finance, Economics, Globus, Brokers, Banks, Collateral-Oriano Mattei

mercoledì 11 dicembre 2019

Hong Kong, China – In what appears to be the first firearm seizure linked to the massive Western-backed protests, Honk Kong police in the former British colony found a semi-automatic pistol and live ammunition – along with knives and even a katana (a Japanese sword).......

MAJOR: Hong Kong Police Retrieve Pistols, 100+ Live Rounds, Swords (PHOTOS)


Hong Kong, China – In what appears to be the first firearm seizure linked to the massive Western-backed protests, Honk Kong police in the former British colony found a semi-automatic pistol and live ammunition – along with knives and even a katana (a Japanese sword).
Hong Kong police have carried out raids early on Sunday, as the city braces for another wave of protests against the local and Beijing government. In wake of the searches, officers found an Austrian-made Glock pistol and four magazines, three of which were loaded with a total of 105 live rounds, RT reported.
Glock is particularly valued by police and security forces worldwide for its simplicity, versatility and firepower. Its customized versions are also one of the best-selling firearms on the civilian market. Police have also put on display an array of narrow-bladed knives and a distinctive Japanese katana sword. Nine extendable batons and bottles of pepper spray were showcased as well.
Commenting on the discovery, senior superintendent Lee Kwai-Wa stated there was a group of rioters that planned to use the weapons to incite chaos during the march and impugn the police. The raids were carried out due to a tip-off leading to protesters who hurled petrol bombs at a police station earlier in October. These bombs become a weapon of choice used during recent street battles.
In late November, forensic teams have discovered thousands of Molotov cocktails, gas canisters and bottles full of chemicals at the Polytechnic University. The campus has been turned into a hideout by masked rioters that targeted riot police outside the university premises.


di Drago Bosnic per "fort-russ.com"

The 12th of December is an official holiday in Russia — Constitution Day. The Constitution, adopted back in 1993, during Boris Yeltsin’s presidency, in fact, provides a solid foundation for president Putin’s current political system. Noteworthy is that, since those truly revolutionary times, the Constitution has remained virtually intact.....

Putin In The Mirror Of Economy And Constitution



The 12th of December is an official holiday in Russia — Constitution Day. The Constitution, adopted back in 1993, during Boris Yeltsin’s presidency, in fact, provides a solid foundation for president Putin’s current political system. Noteworthy is that, since those truly revolutionary times, the Constitution has remained virtually intact.
This very document — the cornerstone of the Russian state — may contain answers to many questions concerning the Russian understanding of politics, economy, human rights, the phenomenon of Putin and his power. These questions, though difficult, are exactly the ones my fellow journalists and political scientists seek to answer. Let’s try to sort it all out.
It is no secret that for the most part Russian society has been, and remains, rather conservative. Due to its long-established political culture, it would prefer a super-centralized state system over the maximum freedom and liberal philosophy in its modern interpretation. Say, whether we like it or not, any political force in Russia that chooses to build its program on the now-trendy libertarianism is doomed to little if any support, even among the youth.
Russians remember too well the history of their country, its turbulent times and periods of political fragmentation, civil wars and consequent external interventions, the epic falls of the magnificent empires (half of the world in size). They, therefore, see a stable state as the ultimate overarching goal and outcome of social development, which they instinctively preserve with care and fear to lose. A short time ago, in the late 1990s, the newly emerged Russia stood at the threshold of another collapse.
Any Russian, irrespective of their political views, will tell you the name of the one who kept it from falling apart. Vladimir Putin. This narrative is deeply ingrained in public consciousness. Perhaps, this is the reason behind the super-centralized state hierarchy within which the principle of separation of powers enshrined in the Russian Constitution is realized, albeit not without flaws.
You won’t find a separate presidential “branch of power” in this document, and yet the Russian Federation is de facto, as they say, a super-presidential republic governed not by civil or public institutions but rather by administrative mechanisms, whose effectiveness depends on whether there is a relevant presidential decree or instruction.
Interestingly, the Russian Constitution of 1993 does not directly define the type of Russia’s economic system but unambiguously identifies its foundation — property. Private, state, municipal, and other forms of property enjoy equal recognition and protection in Russia. Land and other natural resources can also be owned.
However, the population still has a lot of questions as to the legitimacy of private property rights to mineral resources, major infrastructures and industries of critical importance to the country (such as energy, defense, communications, and road networks). We know for a fact that ideas of social justice have always been relevant in Russia. This has to do not only with the legacy of Communist rule but also with Russia’s rapid transition to a market economy, which created a sharp social divide.
The “instantaneous privatization” of the 1990s often provokes heated public discussions. Many Russian citizens believe that, at the time, it was not the Kremlin that ruled the country; the country was run by the “new Russians” — criminal oligarchs who, sitting in their fancy offices, shaped the policy and appointed their puppets to high positions in the government.
Everything changed when Putin came to power to gradually transform that Wild West capitalism into state capitalism, making large businesses serve the interests of the Russian state and, as many believe, Russian society as a whole. For this to happen, he had to demonstrate his power as president (as in the case against Yukos and Mikhail Khodorkovsky).
However, from that time on, it is Russian business elites that carefully write down Putin’s orders and diligently follow them, not the other way around. Putin himself, while denying the need to reconsider the economic outcomes of the way the Soviet Union’s legacy was distributed, keeps creating large state-run corporations which become the country’s biggest taxpayers.
In doing so, Putin upholds the principle of social justice. Of course, when Russia adopted a democratic constitution in 1993, it only outlined its intention to move towards organizing society based on law. Many countries have followed this path for centuries, and — if truth be told — not always very successfully.
Russians have every reason to say that not all provisions contained in this fundamental document work in practice. Although, I assume people out in the streets of Paris and other European capitals can say the same thing about their constitutions. Now, lawyers may say otherwise, but the Russian Constitution was not written from scratch. It was based upon a long record of civil rights struggle and painstaking search for an effective state system.
Seamlessly embedded in Russia’s current political architecture, it proved to be remarkably resilient. Despite the numerous proposals by various political forces to change the Constitution, Putin didn’t succumb to a shifting political environment or personal political ambition and left the fundamental law of the country unchanged. So it seems fair to say that the Constitution has withstood the test of time, while Putin has withstood the test of the Constitution.



di Arthur Evans per "fort-russ.com"

CARACAS – Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro said that during 2019, the US plan to overthrow the South American president failed.....

Maduro Says 2019 Was The Year Of The Failure Of The US Plan In Venezuela


CARACAS – Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro said that during 2019, the US plan to overthrow the South American president failed.
“In 2019 we had to face the failed plan of US imperialism, the failed plan of Mike Pompeo [US Secretary of State] to impose on the country a president no one elected, and we beat him, he is on canvas, defeated, the plan of imperialism failed,” said Maduro.
The statements by the Venezuelan president came after the meeting between Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo in Washington.
After that meeting, Pompeo said he had asked Russia to support opposition deputy and National Assembly president Juan Guaidó, while Lavrov said his country advocated dialogue and non-interference in Venezuela’s internal affairs.
The US government since January has recognized Congressman Guaidó as interim president of Venezuela and classified the elections in which Maduro was reelected as illegitimate.
Russia will not interfere with Venezuela’s internal affairs, either on its own initiative or in cooperation with the US, Federation Council Defense Committee Vice-President Franz Klintsevich said days ago.
The senator stressed that interference in the affairs of any country is unacceptable.
“Russia cooperates with the legitimately elected president of Venezuela, fulfilling all its commitments to the country. The rest is not our concern. Venezuela itself determines the direction of its development and its priorities in foreign policy,” he said.
“Moscow is ready to cooperate with the US in resolving multiple issues, but not in this one. This is a kind of political taboo for us,” Klintsevich added.
An article published on Friday by Bloomberg claims that the Trump Administration is debating various strategies to overthrow the legitimately elected president of Venezuela.
According to one of them, it was possible to try to ally with Russia in order to persuade Maduro to leave power.


di Pail Antonopoulos per "fort-russ.com"

US President Donald Trump will sign an executive order on Wednesday targeting anti-Semitism on college campuses, the White House said, a move that critics called anti-Semitic and a violation of free speech rights......


Trump speaks at the Israeli-American Council Summit in Hollywood, Florida [Maria Alejandra Cardona/Reuters]
Trump speaks at the Israeli-American Council Summit in Hollywood, Florida [Maria Alejandra Cardona/Reuters]

US President Donald Trump will sign an executive order on Wednesday targeting anti-Semitism on college campuses, the White House said, a move that critics called anti-Semitic and a violation of free speech rights.
The order will broaden the federal government's definition of anti-Semitism and instruct it to be used in enforcing laws against discrimination on college campuses, according to unnamed sources speaking to US media. The order was first reported by the New York Times, which said the move would effectively redefine Judaism as a race or nationality. 
Trump has been accused of trafficking in anti-Semitic tropes, including comments about Jewish people and money and insisting that Jews were disloyal if they voted for Democrats. But he has also closely aligned himself with Israel, including moving the US embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem and reversing decades of US policy that considered Israeli settlements in the occupied West Bank illegal under international law. 
In the order, Trump is expected to tell the Department of Education to consider the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance's (IHRA) definition of anti-Semitism, which can include criticism of Israel, when evaluating discrimination complaints under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act.
Title VI bars discrimination on the basis of race, colour and national origin at colleges and universities that receive federal funding. One official said Trump's order would make it clear that Title VI will apply to anti-Semitism as defined by the IHRA. That definition says anti-Semitism may include "targeting of the state of Israel". 
Still, an official speaking to the Associated Press news agency on condition of anonymity, insisted the order was not intended to limit freedom of expression and was not aimed at suppressing the boycott, divestment, sanctions movement, known as BDS, that aims to support Palestinian aspirations for statehood by refusing to buy Israeli products or invest in Israeli companies. The movement in recent years has gained momentum in the United States.
The Israeli government has urged allies to rein in the boycott movement, while its backers deny anti-Semitism charges and describe themselves as critical of Israeli decision-making, not Jewish people.
Another official said the order was a response to an alarming rise in the number of anti-Semitic incidents on campuses and would mean that Jewish students who are discriminated against for their religion have the same kind of recourse as black students who are victimised by racism.
The Anti-Defamation League's (ADL) Center on Extremism found white supremacist propaganda on campuses up 7 percent from the last academic year, which ended this May.
Previous attempts to clarify and codify the application of Title VI to anti-Semitic acts have become bogged down in debates over whether Judaism should be seen as race or is indicative of a national origin. Free-speech advocates have also expressed concerns that a broader definition of anti-Semitism might be used to limit criticism of Israeli government actions. 
The Trump administration has previously acted to constrain perceived campus anti-Semitism - last year reopening a case of alleged discrimination against Jewish students at Rutgers University in New Jersey.
The ADL and the Academic Engagement Network released model guidelines for faculty in November after two instructors at the University of Michigan declined to write letters of recommendation for students seeking to study abroad in Israel.

'Outrageous' 

Palestinian Americans, rights groups, free speech advocates, some Jewish groups and movements against Israeli occupation called the expected order "outrageous", "ant-Semitic" and "insane".
"OUTRAGEOUS: The White Supremacist in Chief is now taking executive action aimed at silencing dissent against Israel's human rights abuses on college campuses," tweeted Yousef Munayyer, executive director of the US Campaign for Palestinian Rights.
"This is not about keeping Jews safe," tweeted If Not Now, a movement against the Israeli occupation. "It's just more antisemitism," the movement added. "Donald Trump cannot be trusted to define antisemitism for Jews. He incites deadly white nationalist violence against our community. He calls us disloyal when speaking to American Jews, he refers to Israel as 'your country' because he believes we do not really belong here."
Emily Mayer, an organiser with If Not Now, added on Twitter: "The order's move to define Judaism as a 'nationality' promotes the classically bigoted idea that American Jews are not American."
Omar Baddar, the deputy director of the Arab American Institute, tweeted that if Trump goes through with the order it would be "the most depraved and far-reaching attempt to brand criticism of Israel, by definition, as anti-Semitism, because Israel = Judaism. INSANE!"
The Republican Jewish Coalition, however, applauded the move, with the group's chairman, former Senator Norm Coleman, calling it "a truly historic and important moment for Jewish Americans" and hailing Trump as "the most pro-Jewish President" in the nation's history.
ADL CEO Jonathan Greenblatt told the New York Times that he hopes the order would be implemented fairly, but "the fact of the matter is we see Jewish students on college campuses and Jewish people all over being marginalised. The rise of anti-Semitic incidents is not theoretical, it's empirical."

da "aljazeera.com"

KYIV -- A lawmaker representing Ukraine's ruling Servant of the People party has been hospitalized following a brawl in the parliament........

The brawl broke out when parliamentarians began debating a draft bill allowing for the privatization of agricultural land. (file photo)


KYIV -- A lawmaker representing Ukraine's ruling Servant of the People party has been hospitalized following a brawl in the parliament.

The party's representative in the parliament, Yevhenia Kravchuk, wrote on Facebook that her colleague Andriy Bohdanets was admitted to hospital with a suspected concussion after the brawl on December 11.

Bohdanets and Eduard Leonov of the nationalist Svoboda party exchanged punches when a parliamentary decision began debating a draft bill allowing for the privatization of agricultural land. The Svoboda party has long opposed the issue.
In a statement, the ruling Servant of the People party called the incident "a deliberate provocation aimed at disrupting the lawmaking process and destabilizing the situation in parliament for the benefit of certain political forces."

Meanwhile, the Svoboda party insists that the brawl was started by Bohdanets.

The National Police force said that it has launched a probe into the incident.

Ukraine introduced a moratorium of land sales in 2001 until January 1, 2020.

On November 13, Ukrainian lawmakers approved in the first reading the bill allowing the sale of agricultural land as of October 2020.

The plan to allow land sales in Ukraine has been supported by Western entities, including the International Monetary Fund and the European Court of Human Rights. But many critics fear such a move would see foreigners buy up land.



da "rferl.org"

A Russian feminist and LGBT activist has been given a heavy fine under a controversial law banning gay "propaganda" – as part of what Amnesty International called a "long-running discriminatory and intensely homophobic campaign" by the authorities.....

Russian feminist and LGBT activist Yulia Tsvetkova (file photo)


A Russian feminist and LGBT activist has been given a heavy fine under a controversial law banning gay "propaganda" – as part of what Amnesty International called a "long-running discriminatory and intensely homophobic campaign" by the authorities.

Yulia Tsvetkova, a fairly prominent figure in the Far Eastern city of Komsomolsk-on-Amur, was found guilty of "propaganda of non-traditional sexual relations among minors" -- an administrative offense -- and fined 50,000 rubles ($ 780) for being the administrator of two LGBT-themed groups on social media, Amnesty International said in a statement on December 11.

It said both communities were marked "18+," as required by Russian law, making the fine imposed on Tsvetkova unfounded under the gay "propaganda" legislation.

"Once again, a Russian human rights activist pays a heavy price -- in every sense -- for simply spreading the ideals of inclusiveness, tolerance, and women’s empowerment," according to Natalia Zviagina, the London-based human rights watchdog’s Russia director.

The activist, who is currently under house arrest, is still facing criminal charges that are punishable by up to six years in prison.

She was put under house arrest in November and charged with the "production and dissemination of pornographic materials" over drawings of female genitals she posted on social media.

Zviagina said Tsvetkova had been "arbitrarily detained, interrogated and intimidated on multiple occasions."

"Her theatrical and creative initiatives have been stifled by law enforcement officers, and her drawings now judged as pornographic," she said.



da "rferl.org"

An agreement for a joint Russian-Serbian effort to fight cancer makes no reference to investigating the possible effects of NATO's bombing of Serbia two decades ago, despite Serbian media claims apparently based on statements by Russia's ambassador to Belgrade......

A member of a Russian delegation visiting Belgrade in April 1999 looks at the building of the Serbian Interior Ministry which was totally destroyed in overnight NATO bombing.


An agreement for a joint Russian-Serbian effort to fight cancer makes no reference to investigating the possible effects of NATO's bombing of Serbia two decades ago, despite Serbian media claims apparently based on statements by Russia's ambassador to Belgrade.

The contradiction surfaced after Serbia's state-run Institute of Oncology and Radiology inked a deal with its Russian counterpart in September on closer cooperation in research and other activities.

"We will do everything in our power for the best possible cooperation," Russian Ambassador Aleksandr Botsan-Kharchenko told attendees at the signing ceremony for the agreement, according to the Serbian daily Blic.

But he added: "Russia is also ready to investigate the consequences of the NATO bombing, which are more than obvious to cancer patients."

Some Serbian officials have argued that a link exists between the 1999 NATO bombings of Serbia within rump Yugoslavia and the incidence of malignant blood and other disorders among children exposed to bombed sites, despite medical evidence to the contrary.

Moscow staunchly opposed the alliance's attack on its closest Balkan ally and has since argued that NATO expansion into the former Eastern Bloc after the fall of communism represents a major threat to Russian interests.

NATO has added the former Yugoslav republics of Slovenia, Croatia, and, in 2017, Montenegro as new members. North Macedonia has also been approved as a member and is expected to officially join in 2020.
Russian Ambassador to Serbia Aleksandr Botsan-Kharchenko (file photo)
Russian Ambassador to Serbia Aleksandr Botsan-Kharchenko (file photo)
Botsan-Kharchenko reportedly went on to say in September: "Some will say that Russia wants to participate solely because of its negative attitude to NATO, but this is not true. Every doctor well knows: the cause of the disease must first be known and we will be working on it."

The bombing of rump Yugoslavia, code-named Operation Allied Force by NATO, began in March 1999 and was aimed at ending violence between ethnic Albanians and mostly ethnic Serbian forces during a two-year counterinsurgency war.

Belgrade's Institute of Oncology and Radiology told RFE/RL in response to a recent query that they hadn't conducted any research on the health consequences of the NATO bombings.

It added that it "is not actively involved in examining the consequences of the NATO bombing."

But institute officials declined to divulge the details of their agreement with the National Medical Research Radiology Center, which is under the auspices of the Russian Health Ministry.

RFE/RL's Balkan Service obtained a copy of the September agreement after an appeal to Serbia's commissioner for information of public importance and personal data protection. 

The text commits its Russian and Serbian signatories to joint research and activities including seminars, student and professional exchanges, and other events.

It makes no mention of NATO's 1999 military campaign or related incidents.

It also obliges both sides to "keep confidential information about their activities" in connection with the agreement.

Serbian politicians and activists have launched multiple efforts -- some of them through state institutions -- to pursue suspicions on the possible health effects allegedly related to the NATO bombing.
Depleted Uranium

They appear to rest on the use of ammunition containing depleted uranium during the 78-day aerial assault to force Belgrade to withdraw predominantly Serb-Yugoslav troops from Kosovo.

Serbian lawmaker Darko Laketic, who heads a parliamentary Commission for Researching Health Impacts of the NATO Bombing, said in March that a study commissioned by his group in tandem with the Batut Institute of Public Health had shown "unambiguously" that children born after 1999 were exposed to something left amid the rubble.

Other legislators said at the time that they had waited months for details of that study but "so far nothing."

But many medical experts say there is no link between depleted uranium and cancer.

Zoran Radovanovic, an epidemiologist and the chairman of the Serbian Medical Association's ethics committee, denied last year that there had been an uptick in cancer cases where the NATO bombings occurred, Balkan Insight reported.
Serbian Zoran Radovanovic (file photo)
Serbian Zoran Radovanovic (file photo)
He added that Serbians are often frightened about a cancer epidemic that does not exist.

NATO has said some 3,000 cruise missiles fell on targets across Kosovo and what is now Serbia during the campaign, including heavy bombardment of the capital, Belgrade.

Some of the munitions contained depleted uranium, a leftover product from the enrichment process for uranium 235. It is used in warheads because of its extreme hardness, which allows it to penetrate armored targets and fortified buildings.

But NATO has repeatedly claimed the depleted uranium shares no link to people suffering adverse health effects.

U.S. Ambassador to Serbia Kyle Scott told Balkan Insight last year that the World Health Organization and the United Nations had determined that depleted uranium does not pose a serious health risk.

Its radioactivity is far below that of its original form, but depleted uranium is still considered toxic and listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as a "radiation health hazard when inside the body."

Multiple Serbian news outlets linked the September agreement to the claims against NATO, citing the Russian ambassador.
Serbian newspaper headlines on the alleged link between the NATO bombings and the incidence of cancer.
Serbian newspaper headlines on the alleged link between the NATO bombings and the incidence of cancer.
"Russia will also assist Serbia in examining the consequences of the NATO bombing," because, according to the ambassador, "the consequences for human health are obvious," RTS said of Botsan-Kharchenko's appearance.

"Russia is seeking cooperation to investigate the consequences of NATO bombing at the state level," reported Belgrade-based Vecernje Novosti

The Serbs' pullout from Kosovo in 1999 led to the establishment of a UN interim administration in Kosovo that paved the way to a declaration of Kosovar independence in 2008 that Belgrade and Moscow still don't recognize.

Moscow has long sought to leverage its close historical relationship with Belgrade to undermine Western institutions and oppose European integration efforts in the Balkans.

Those efforts have included diplomatic support for Serbia's opposition to Kosovo sovereignty and an abortive coup in Montenegro that involved Russian and Serbian intelligence officials in the run-up to Montenegro's NATO accession in 2018.

NATO cooperation with Russia was "suspended" in 2014 in response to that country's invasion of Ukraine, a nonmember that has since declared NATO membership a foreign-policy priority.
Written by Andy Heil based on reporting by Balkan Service correspondent Sonja Gocanin

Edward Felsenthal, the editor-in-chief of TIME boasted that 16-year-old Greta Thunberg is the magazine’s youngest choice to be named Person of the Year........


Greta Thunberg wins TIME Person of the Year: It’s a symptom of a sick & confused world when adults make children their leaders
The willingness of adults to listen to teenagers rather than themselves is a sign of a deep societal crisis in the West.
Edward Felsenthal, the editor-in-chief of TIME boasted that 16-year-old Greta Thunberg is the magazine’s youngest choice to be named Person of the Year.
I was not the least bit surprised – by now it would have been an upset if the headline-making environmentalist failed to reap yet another publicity reward  – but still alarmed.
Gone are the days when TIME chose adult men, like Martin Luther King or Winston Churchill as the magazine’s person of the year (Adolf Hitler too – the award is for the most influential, not necessarily the most virtuous public figure).
These days the accent is on youth, and Greta Thunberg personifies the much acclaimed ‘wisdom of the child’. That is why three Norwegian MPs nominated Thunberg for the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize.
The transformation of a teen schoolgirl into the global conscience for climate change is driven by the imperative of reversing the relationship between adults and children.
Throughout the Western world the authority of adulthood is in crisis. Adulthood is increasingly associated with negative attributes and grown ups feel less and less able to provide guidance to young people. The flip side of the erosion of adult authority is the tendency to look to young people for solutions and answers. That is why Western society’s depreciation of adulthood coexists with adulation of the supposed wisdom of children.
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Arguably the most grotesque manifestation of this trend is the spectacle of politicians and dignitaries intently listening to Greta at high profile international meetings. A thunderous standing ovation is guaranteed by the mere appearance of this symbol of an infantilised political culture.
In making her TIME magazine’s Person of the Year or offering her a platform at a meeting of world leaders, children are in effect invited to condemn the older generation. And Greta has been more than ready to rise to the occasion. The theme of adult irresponsibility has been her most common refrain – appearing in her lecture to the United Nations climate change summit as far back as a year ago, and in every major speech she has made this year.
“Since our leaders are behaving like children, we will have to take the responsibility they should have taken long ago,” she said last December. “We have to understand what the older generation has dealt to us, what mess they have created that we have to clean up and live with.”
Green demonstrators have readily embraced the narrative of adult guilt. Posters declaring, ‘You’ll Die of Old Age, We’ll Die of Climate Change’ or ‘I Am Ditching School Because You Are Ditching Our Future’ point the finger of blame at slothful adults who are supposedly responsible for the imminent early deaths of their offspring. Recently, a placard screaming ‘Adults Ruin Everything. Stop Brexit’ at an anti-Brexit demonstration indicated that the spirit of adult blaming is not confined to the problem of planetary destruction.
Encouraging children to revolt against their irresponsible elders is the inevitable outcome of adult-blaming. That is why the head of politics at Cambridge University could call for children as young as six to be given the vote. Professor David Runciman advocated this proposal on the grounds that young people were “massively outnumbered” by the elderly and that this created a democratic crisis that had to be put right.

ALSO ON RT.COMWhile Greta Thunberg hitches another top-dollar yacht ride to Europe, plebs will live with ‘flight shame’
You know that society is in deep trouble when six-year-olds are assigned the responsibility for determining society’s future – but this is not just about battle lines being drawn up according to generational divides.
Greta and other unspoilt youth idols provide cover for the anything-but-innocent elites, who can hide that they lack the courage of their convictions, or the ability to get others to follow them behind the fiery rhetoric of youth.
Who needs grown ups to lead the nation when children are ready to put right the mistakes created by old people? But that might not be quite the optimistic sentiment it is presented as.

da "rt.com"

The US rolled out new sanctions against Iranian companies, including its largest airline Mahan Air, accused of “weapons of mass destruction proliferation” and transportation of lethal aid to Yemen.......


Washington expands sanctions against Iran's largest airline, accusing it of weapons of mass destruction proliferation
The US rolled out new sanctions against Iranian companies, including its largest airline Mahan Air, accused of “weapons of mass destruction proliferation” and transportation of lethal aid to Yemen.
The airline, which has been a target of Washington’s restrictions since 2011,  has been repeatedly accused by the US of having deep ties with the Iraninan Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) and regularly transporting its troops and hardware around the region.
“The Iranian regime uses its aviation and shipping industries to supply its regional terrorist and militant groups with weapons, directly contributing to the devastating humanitarian crises in Syria and Yemen,” US Secretary of the Treasury Steven T. Mnuchin said in a statement.
ALSO ON RT.COMIran ready for big prisoner exchange with Washington but ‘ball is in US’ court’ – Zarif
This time, the airline was sanctioned under the Executive Oder 13382 which targets “proliferators of weapons of mass destruction and their supporters.” It was not immediately clear how exactly the company engaged in such alleged activities.
The allegations that the airline has been proliferating WMDs in some fashion are “ridiculous,” a professor at the University of Tehran, Seyed Mohammad Marandi, says. The new restrictions are yet another attempt to harm the Iranian people, who are the real target of the economic war – despite claims from Washington it only seeks to hit the authorities of the Islamic Republic.
“It’s ridiculous and everyone knows it’s ridiculous. The United States is engaging in economic warfare against Iran and ordinary Iranians,” Marandi told RT. “The Americans have sanctioned Iranian airlines for decades now, and what they want to do is make it more dangerous for people to fly.”
The Treasury sanctioned three general sales agents of Mahan Air, as well as dozens of aircraft belonging to or operated by the airline.
The sanctions might have “very heavy implications” for the airline, which will likely be barred from using airports in countries fearful of secondary sanctions coming from the US, as well as likely causing other problems, former Pentagon official Michael Maloof believes.
“It could affect their ability to get component parts, depending upon the type of an aircraft,” he told RT. “It could be devastating in that respect and affect the safety of passengers. It could ultimately have the effect of shutting down the airline – and maybe that’s what they [the US] want to do.”
Besides the air carrier, the sanctions also targeted an Iranian businessman, Abdolhossein Khedri, and two shipping companies belonging to him. The businessman stands accused of “terrorism support” and partaking in the IRGC“smuggling operations.”
US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the move is part of "maximum pressure campaign of sanctions against Iran."
ALSO ON RT.COMIran unveils budget plan to fend off US sanctions by cutting dependence on oil
Mahan Air is the largest privately-owned airline of Iran, boasting a fleet of 55 aircraft. The company operates scheduled flights to over 40 domestic and international destinations. Apart from being known for repeatedly getting into trouble with the US, the company made international headlines this April when it launched the first-ever direct Tehran-Caracas route.

da "rt.com"