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giovedì 21 giugno 2018

Washington and Moscow are "looking at the possibility" of Donald Trump meeting with Vladimir Putin in July, US President Donald Trump has stated....


Trump eyes July meeting with Putin as Bolton expected to arrive in Moscow
Washington and Moscow are "looking at the possibility" of Donald Trump meeting with Vladimir Putin in July, US President Donald Trump has stated.
"We're looking at the possibility" of a Putin meeting in July, Trump said in response to a reporter's question at the White House on Thursday. 
Responding to reporter's question @POTUS confirms he's planning to meet with President Putin and other leaders soon.
Meanwhile, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov stressed to reporters in Moscow that nothing has been finalized.
"When and if we are ready, we will make the announcement,” he said.
Two possible scenarios for the meetings are either before or after the NATO summit in Brussels in July, or after Trump's visit to the UK on July 13, a source told Bloomberg on Wednesday. The source asked not to be identified, noting that the plans aren't final. 
It comes after White House National Security Council spokesman Garrett Marquis confirmed in a tweet on Thursday that US National Security Adviser John Bolton will visit Russia next week to discuss a “potential meeting” between Trump and Putin.

On June 25-27, U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton will meet with U.S. allies in London and Rome to discuss national security issues, and travel to Moscow to discuss a potential meeting between Presidents Trump and Putin.
Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov also stated that Moscow is expecting Bolton to visit Russia.
“As far as we know, such a visit [from Bolton] will indeed take place. That’s all that we can say at the moment,” Peskov told reporters on Thursday.
Trump has so far had two meetings with Putin, both of which took place last summer at the G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany.

da "rt.com"

Thousands of civilians have fled regime bombardment on rebel-held areas in Syria's southern province of Deraa since Tuesday, with most moving into other rebel-held areas in the south, according to media reports. The civilians fleeing al-Herak and Busra al-Harir were "heading to nearby villages under rebel control not affected by the bombardment near the Jordanian border". ...

Syrian offensive displaces thousands in rebel-held Deraa
Smoke rises after Assad forces and their Iranian supporters conduct an operation in Deraa, Syria on June 20, 2018 [Anadolu]

Thousands of civilians have fled regime bombardment on rebel-held areas in Syria's southern province of Deraa since Tuesday, with most moving into other rebel-held areas in the south, according to media reports.
The civilians fleeing al-Herak and Busra al-Harir were "heading to nearby villages under rebel control not affected by the bombardment near the Jordanian border". 
The fresh offensive further undermines an international "de-escalation" agreement backed by the United States in the face of a threatened offensive.
Government planes dropped leaflets this week over rebel-held parts of Deraa province, comparing the area to the Damascus suburbs of Eastern Ghouta and urging its residents to "cooperate" with the armed forces to drive out armed groups.
The government besieged Eastern Ghouta before waging a crushing military offensive. Government troops are meanwhile massing, mostly in the nearby Sweida province.
State media said the government is shelling what it called terrorist posts northeast of Deraa, destroying their weapons.
The government turned its attention to the south after capturing the last rebel-held areas around the capital, Damascus, earlier this year.
After that string of military victories, the regime has set its sights on retaking rebel-held areas of southern Syria - whether through negotiations or a military operation.
Rebel groups have responded by establishing a joint operations command to coordinate their defence of what the opposition refers to as the "death triangle."
Rebel factions hold parts of the city and areas to its west and east. The rebels also control areas along the borders with Jordan and the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights.

'Truce'

The US, Russia and Jordan negotiated a truce for the area, which borders Jordan and the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights, in July of last year. But the calm has started to unravel in recent weeks.
Syrian President Bashar al-Assad told Iranian TV last week that talks between the Russians, Americans and Israelis are still "ongoing," but said Iranian presence in the area was not negotiable.
Israel is believed to be seeking an agreement in which Iran and its allied militias would withdraw from the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights, while the US State Department has said any government assault would "broaden the conflict," and has threatened "firm and appropriate measures in response."
Israel has meanwhile carried out attacks against Syrian and Iranian forces in the area in recent months, after repeatedly warning against any Iranian buildup near the occupied Golan Heights.
Iran is a close ally of al-Assad, and its advisers are embedded with his troops. Iranian-backed armed groups are also believed to be deployed in the area.
Syria's war has killed more than 350,000 people and displaced millions since it started in 2011 with the brutal repression of anti-regime protests.

da "aljazeera-com"

Ambassadors of the Group of Seven (G7) leading industrialized states say they are "deeply concerned" about the situation of film director Oleh Sentsov and "other Ukrainian prisoners and detainees" in Russia. "Their release, as part of a broader bilateral exchange of detainees, would be an important humanitarian step forward," the countries' ambassadors to Kyiv said in a joint statement released via Twitter on June 21.......

Ukrainian film director Oleg Sentsov stands inside a defendants' cage during a hearing at a military court in the city of Rostov-on-Don in July 2015.



Ambassadors of the Group of Seven (G7) leading industrialized states say they are "deeply concerned" about the situation of film director Oleh Sentsov and "other Ukrainian prisoners and detainees" in Russia.
"Their release, as part of a broader bilateral exchange of detainees, would be an important humanitarian step forward," the countries' ambassadors to Kyiv said in a joint statement released via Twitter on June 21.
The G7 consists of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Britain, and the United States.
Separately, the U.S. Embassy in Kyiv urged Russia to act as the eyes of the international community were on the country that is hosting the World Cup soccer tournament.
"With the world watching the World Cup, Russia should allow access to all Ukrainian prisoners, including film director Oleg Sentsov, who is in his 2nd month of a hunger strike in a Russian prison," the embassy tweeted.
Ukrainian Ombudswoman Lyudmyla Denisova, who traveled to Russia last week, has not been allowed to meet with Sentsov and other Ukrainians considered as political prisoners by Kyiv.
The Russian state-run RIA Novosti news agency quoted Anatoly Sak, an ombudsman in the Siberian region, as saying that he had visited Sentsov recently and that the activist was in satisfactory condition: alert and receiving nutrition through an IV.
There was no way to independently confirm the official's comments.
Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko spoke with his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, via telephone on June 21, calling on him to allow Denisova access to the Ukrainian "hostages," according to Ukraine’s presidential website.
The Kremlin said that, during the call, initiated by Kyiv, the sides touched on the topic of prisoner exchanges and visits by monitors from each country to the other's prisons.
Sentsov, a vocal opponent of Russia's 2014 annexation of Crimea, is currently on hunger strike while serving a 20-year sentence in far-northern Russia.
A native of Crimea, he is demanding the release of 64 Ukrainian citizens he considers political prisoners.
The 41-year-old was sentenced in 2015 for conspiracy to commit terror acts, charges he and human rights groups say were politically motivated.
Western governments and rights organizations have called for Sentsov to be released, and the Russian human rights group Memorial considers him a political prisoner.
On June 20, the secretary-general of the Council of Europe urged Russia to free him "on humanitarian grounds."
"If there is a need for a request for pardoning him, I would gladly do it on the basis of the European Convention of Human Rights," Thorbjorn Jagland told Russian Ombudswoman Tatyana Moskalkova, the Interfax news agency reported after their meeting in Moscow.
Jagland made the call two days after a dozen leading names in the Russian arts called for President Vladimir Putin to pardon Sentsov.
But Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters that the Ukrainian film director would have to ask for the pardon himself before it could be considered.
With reporting by AFP

U.S. national security adviser John Bolton plans to travel to Moscow in the next few days to discuss a potential meeting between President Donald Trump and Russian leader Vladimir Putin, the White House said hours after the Kremlin suggested Bolton's trip would take place.

U.S. national security adviser John Bolton (file photo)



U.S. national security adviser John Bolton plans to travel to Moscow in the next few days to discuss a potential meeting between President Donald Trump and Russian leader Vladimir Putin, the White House said hours after the Kremlin suggested Bolton's trip would take place.
"On June 25-27, U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton will meet with U.S. allies in London and Rome to discuss national security issues, and travel to Moscow to discuss a potential meeting between Presidents Trump and Putin," Garrett Marquis, special assistant to the president, wrote on Twitter.
Bolton's specific itinerary was not immediately released.
The U.S. comments come hours after Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov had indicated to reporters that Bolton would visit Moscow.
"As far as we know, such a trip will actually take place. This is all that we can say right now," Peskov told reporters on June 21 when asked whether Moscow was expecting Bolton's visit.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said Russia was "ready for contacts" with the United States.
"If the agreement on a high-level meeting is reached, it will be announced," Lavrov added.
The U.S. president said in March he would meet Putin soon, but since then ties between Washington and Moscow have further deteriorated over the conflict in Syria and the poisoning of a former Russian spy in Britain, which the West blames on Moscow.
Based on reporting by Reuters, TASS, and Interfax

NATO's secretary-general says he is confident close bonds between Europe and the United States will survive despite current differences over trade and U.S. decisions to withdraw from the Paris climate accord and the Iran nuclear deal. "Our bond is strong, but some are doubting the strength of that bond. And, yes, we see differences," Jens Stoltenberg told an audience in London....

NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg made his comments before an audience in London on June 21.



NATO's secretary-general says he is confident close bonds between Europe and the United States will survive despite current differences over trade and U.S. decisions to withdraw from the Paris climate accord and the Iran nuclear deal.
"Our bond is strong, but some are doubting the strength of that bond. And, yes, we see differences," Jens Stoltenberg told an audience in London.
"It is not written in stone that the transatlantic bond will survive forever, but I believe we will preserve it," he added. 
Stoltenberg said that "we may have seen the weakening" of some bonds, but he insisted that "maintaining the transatlantic partnership is in our strategic interests."
His remarks came before a summit of NATO leaders in Brussels in July.
U.S. President Donald Trump, who has consistently criticized alliance allies for what he sees as an insufficient level of defense spending, is expected to attend. 
Stoltenberg said he expected Trump to be "very strong" on defense at the summit, including his demand that NATO members honor a commitment to raise defense outlays to 2 percent of national output.
'Unpredictable Security Environment'
The NATO chief said in his speech that it was important to recognize that European states had started to increase their spending.
"It is possible to say we have done a lot, but a lot remains," he said.
Stoltenberg said the world faced "the most unpredictable security environment in a generation" because of the threat of terrorism, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, cyberattacks, and an aggressive Russian foreign policy.
"We must continue to protect our multilateral institutions like NATO, and we must continue to stand up for the international rules-based order," he said.
Some European officials have expressed concerns that the U.S. administration will not act strongly enough to punish Moscow for perceived misdeeds, including interference in elections and the nerve-agent poisoning of former spy in England, which Britain blames on Russia.
Trump last month shocked allies at a Group of Seven (G7) summit in Canada when he suggested that Russia be allowed back into the group of leading industrial powers. Moscow was expelled after its annexation of Ukraine’s Crimea region in 2014.
Some allies have also expressed concerns over reports that Trump may meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin when he travels to Europe for the NATO summit.
But Stoltenberg said fellow NATO leaders would have no problem with a Trump-Putin summit.
"We are in favor of dialogue with Russia," he said. "We don't want a new cold war. We don't want a new arms race. We don't want to isolate Russia."
With reporting by Reuters, AFP, and AP

German Chancellor Angela Merkel has called on Europe to "urgently" take measures to counter Iran’s "aggressive" activities in the Middle East. "Iran's aggressive tendencies must not only be discussed, but rather we need solutions urgently," she said on June 21 after meeting Jordan's King Abdullah in Amman....

German Chancellor Angela Merkel (file photo)



German Chancellor Angela Merkel has called on Europe to "urgently" take measures to counter Iran’s "aggressive" activities in the Middle East.
"Iran's aggressive tendencies must not only be discussed, but rather we need solutions urgently," she said on June 21 after meeting Jordan's King Abdullah in Amman.
Merkel added that while European countries wanted to maintain the 2015 nuclear accord with Tehran, they remained concerned about Iran's ballistic missile program, its presence in Syria, and its role in the bloody civil war in Yemen.
In May, U.S. President Donald Trump pulled his country out of the landmark deal that provided Iran with relief from sanctions in return for curbs on its nuclear program.
Trump said he was unhappy with the terms of the deal and with Iran’s continued testing of ballistic missiles and its support for militants in the Middle East.
Iran denied it backed insurgents in the region and said its nuclear program was only for civilian purposes.
Germany has remained in the nuclear deal and had unsuccessfully urged Washington to also stay with the accord.
Merkel also expressed support for Jordanian concerns about Iranian activity near its border with southwestern Syria.
Tehran is closely allied with Damascus and, along with Russia, has supported Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in the civil war against Western-backed rebels.
"You live not just with the Syria conflict, but also we see Iran's activities with regard to Israel's security and with regard to Jordan's border," she said.
Meanwhile, the White House announced on June 21 that King Abdullah will meet with Trump in Washington on June 25.
"President Trump looks forward to reaffirming the strong bonds of friendship between the United States and Jordan. The leaders will discuss issues of mutual concern, including terrorism, the threat from Iran, and the crisis in Syria, and working towards a lasting peace between Israelis and Palestinians," a statement said.
With on reporting by Reuters and The Jerusalem Post

Iran's soccer team suffered a defeat on June 20, but women in the country still had reason to celebrate after they were allowed to attend a sporting event at a stadium for the first time in nearly 40 years. The World Cup match, which resulted in a 1-0 loss to Spain, took place in the Russian city of Kazan, but Iranian women were able to attend a public viewing of the game in Tehran's Azadi Stadium....

Iranian female soccer supporters were given a rare opportunity to cheer their team on at a special live transmission in Tehran of their country's World Cup game with Spain on June 20.



Iran's soccer team suffered a defeat on June 20, but women in the country still had reason to celebrate after they were allowed to attend a sporting event at a stadium for the first time in nearly 40 years.
The World Cup match, which resulted in a 1-0 loss to Spain, took place in the Russian city of Kazan, but Iranian women were able to attend a public viewing of the game in Tehran's Azadi Stadium.
"That was the real big victory," women's activist Tajebeh Siawoshi was quoted by Iranian news agency ISNA as saying on June 21.
Officials said the lifting of the ban on women in stadiums was only for the match against Spain.
But activists have expressed hopes that it could lead to a total lifting of the ban.
"If all goes well, this could be a prelude to the general lifting of the women's stadium ban,” Siawoshi said before the match.
Women in Iran have been banned from entering stadiums since the Islamic Revolution in 1979.
'So Much Fun'
Clerics in the conservative Muslim-majority nation have said it is immoral for women to attend matches with male fans and athletes.
But after domestic and international protests against the policy heightened during the World Cup, Iranian authorities reversed policy and allowed women to access the stadium in family sections to watch the match against Spain.
However, uncertainty remained until the last minute. Police attempted to cancel the viewing, claiming "infrastructural deficiencies," according to a report by Thomson Reuters.
Police relented after the Interior Ministry gave instructions to allow spectators into the stadium.
"I did not know that it was so much fun to roar for two hours and be close to a heart attack," a woman fan wrote on Twitter after viewing the match.
A previous planned showing for Iran's opening match against Morocco was canceled at the last minute without a reason being given.
So far, Iran has won one game and tied one in the World Cup and will next next face Portugal in Saransk on June 25.
Iran's 1-0 victory over Morocco in their first game was just its second-ever victory at a World Cup.
With reporting by Thomson Reuters Foundation, INSA, and dpa

PAOLO SAVONA DICHIARA : "No, questo è volutamente falso. Ho sempre sostenuto che l'Italia ha assolutamente bisogno del mercato comune". Così Paolo Savona, ministro per le Politiche comunitarie, risponde a chi, in un'intervista al 'sussidiario.net', gli ricorda di essere stato accusato di essere contro l'euro e di proporre "QuItaly", la versione italiana della Brexit in cui l'Italia avrebbe abbandonato la moneta unica.


paolo savona col suo libro (2)PAOLO SAVONA COL SUO LIBRO (2)
SAVONA, FALSO CHE IO SIA STATO CONTRO L'EURO 
(ANSA) - "No, questo è volutamente falso. Ho sempre sostenuto che l'Italia ha assolutamente bisogno del mercato comune". Così Paolo Savona, ministro per le Politiche comunitarie, risponde a chi, in un'intervista al 'sussidiario.net', gli ricorda di essere stato accusato di essere contro l'euro e di proporre "QuItaly", la versione italiana della Brexit in cui l'Italia avrebbe abbandonato la moneta unica.
paolo savona (6)PAOLO SAVONA (6)

"Quanto è successo dal Trattato di Roma in poi - sostiene Savona - conferma la sua importanza per la crescita italiana. Per avere un mercato unico, è necessario avere una moneta unica, senza la quale l'unità del mercato sarebbe rotta. La mia posizione - chiarisce - è che la costruzione del Trattato del 1992 è incompleta e dovrebbe essere migliorata se l'Europa intende superare i suoi tormenti interni e fare i conti da un punto di vista geopolitico e geoeconomico. Naturalmente, queste riforme non possono essere attuate da un giorno all'altro. È necessario attendere la commissione e trovare un accordo, un consenso, tra i partner".

SAVONA, ITALIA DEVE RICONOSCERE IMPORTANZA GERMANIA 
(ANSA) - "L'Italia deve riconoscere l'importanza della Germania sulla scena mondiale. Le debolezze dei paesi membri dell'Unione si riflettono nel futuro geopolitico della Germania e, pertanto, è nel suo stesso interesse aiutare quei paesi a uscire dalle loro situazioni negative". Lo afferma il ministro per le Politiche Ue Paolo Savona in un'intervista a 'ilsussidiario.net'.
paolo savonaPAOLO SAVONA

"Se la Germania si limita a sollevare problemi e imporre vincoli invece di indicare soluzioni - sostiene Savona - i movimenti antieuropei saranno rafforzati, potrebbero destabilizzare l'Europa e riaprire vecchie ferite che non sono ancora state sanate. La soluzione ideale potrebbe essere che la Ue offra nuove soluzioni per guidare le forze di crescita, soddisfacendo le esigenze di molti paesi europei, tra cui l'Italia. Gli Stati Uniti non hanno intenzione di ripetere la loro intelligente e costosa politica e le prestazioni del dopoguerra di aiutare l'Europa a uscire dalle ferite che si è autoinflitte. Questa volta dobbiamo affrontare i problemi da soli", conclude.


mercoledì 20 giugno 2018

US President Donald Trump has signed an executive order that would keep families together after they get detained crossing the border illegally. The order was drafted by Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen in an effort to end what has become a major crisis for the Trumpadministration.....

Trump reverses course on separation of migrant families
Children of migrants caught by US Border Patrol agents while crossing the border are held at the Central Processing Center in McAllen, Texas [US Customs and Border Protection/AFP]

US President Donald Trump has signed an executive order that would keep families together after they get detained crossing the border illegally.
The order was drafted by Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen in an effort to end what has become a major crisis for the Trumpadministration.
"We're going to have very strong borders but we are going to keep families together," the president said, adding that he doesn't like seeing children separated from their families.
However, he also said that the 'zero tolerance' policy on illegal immigration will continue.
The order marks a dramatic departure for an administration that has been insisting, wrongly, that it has no choice but to separate families apprehended at the border because of the law and a court decision.
Al Jazeera's White House correspondant Kimberly Halkett described the action as a "tremendous reversal of policy" but that the broader issue of immigration is still yet to be resolved.
"This is just a stop-gap measure to end the child separations," she said. "Democrats and Republicans - although they are both blaming each other - have not resolved the broader issue of immigration reform that has been stymying this congress and law makers for about two decades or longer."
Nielsen, the president and other officials have repeatedly said the only way to end the practice is for Congress to pass new legislation, though both Democrats and some Republicans have said the president could reverse it with a simple phone call.
The news in recent days has been dominated by searing images of children held in cagesat border facilities, as well as audio recordings of young children crying for their parents.
Earlier on Wednesday, Trump blamed the Democrats for the impasse in Congress.
"It's the Democrats fault, they won't give us the votes needed to pass good immigration legislation," he tweeted.
"They want open borders, which breeds horrible crime. Republicans want security."
Senator Jeff Merkley said that the exeuctive action does not necessarily reflect a positive solution.
"Details yet to come, but @realDonaldTrump's 'solution' to family separation sounds like handcuffs for all," he said in a post on Twitter.
"Locking up children and families in detention centers is unacceptable and un-American."
Nicole AustinHillery, the US executive director at Human Rights Watch, agreed.
"[Republicans] in the Senate are now considering detaining families as a unit in response to the national outcry from tearing families apart," she said.
"This is not a solution just a change in how the damage is done."
Homeland Security officials did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Zero tolerance 

The administration recently put into place a "zero tolerance" policy in which all unlawful border crossings are referred for prosecution - a process that moves adults to the custody of the US Marshals Service and sends many children to facilities run by the Department of Health and Human Services.
Under the Obama administration, such families were usually referred for civil deportation proceedings, not requiring separation.
The policy had led to a spike in family separations in recent weeks, with more than 2,300 minors were separated from their families at the border from May 5 through June 9, according to the Department of Homeland Security.
Nielsen's action would not end the zero tolerance policy, but would aim to keep families together and ask the Department of Defense to help house the detained families.
Nielsen is working with the other agencies, including the Justice Department, Health and Human Services and the law enforcement agencies within Homeland Security on the proposed changes.
The aim is to legally work around a settlement that prevents the detention of families together for more than 20 days, or defy the order and force it back into court to argue for changes to settlement.
The settlement of a class-action lawsuit set policies for the treatment and release of unaccompanied children who are caught at the border.
The Flores settlement, named for a teenage girl who brought the case in the 1980s, requires the government to release children from custody and to their parents, adult relatives or other caretakers, in order of preference.
If those options are exhausted, authorities must find the "least restrictive" setting for the child who arrived without parents.
In 2015, a federal judge in Los Angeles expanded the terms of the settlement, ruling that it applies to children who are caught with their parents as well as to those who come to the US alone.
Other recent rulings, upheld on appeal, affirm the children's rights to a bond hearing and require better conditions at the Border Patrol's short-term holding facilities.
In 2016, the Ninth US Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that child migrants who came to the border with parents and were held in custody must be released.
The decision did not state parents must be released. Neither, though, did it require parents to be kept in detention, apart from their children.
Will the US reform immigration laws?
INSIDE STORY
Will the US reform immigration laws?

da "aljazeera.com"

The chief of Europe's top human rights body is urging Russia to release imprisoned Ukrainian film director Oleh Sentsov, who is currently on hunger strike while serving a 20-year sentence. Thorbjorn Jagland, secretary-general of the Council of Europe, on June 20 told Russian Ombudswoman Tatyana Moskalkova that Sentsov "should be released on humanitarian grounds," the Interfax news agency reported after their meeting in Moscow....

Thorbjorn Jagland, secretary-general of the Council of Europe (file photo)



The chief of Europe's top human rights body is urging Russia to release imprisoned Ukrainian film director Oleh Sentsov, who is currently on hunger strike while serving a 20-year sentence.
Thorbjorn Jagland, secretary-general of the Council of Europe, on June 20 told Russian Ombudswoman Tatyana Moskalkova that Sentsov "should be released on humanitarian grounds," the Interfax news agency reported after their meeting in Moscow.
"If there is a need for a request for pardoning him, I would gladly do it on the basis of the European Convention of Human Rights," Jagland added.
On June 18, a dozen leading names in the Russian arts, including Andrei Zvyagintsev and fellow filmmaker Aleksandr Sokurov, called for President Vladimir Putin to pardon Sentsov.
Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters that Sentsov would have to ask for the pardon himself before it could be considered.
Sentsov, a vocal opponent of Russia's 2014 annexation of Crimea, was sentenced in 2015 to 20 years for conspiracy to commit terrorist acts.
A native of Crimea, he and human rights groups say the charges were politically motivated. On May 14, he began a hunger strike, demanding the release of 64 Ukrainian citizens he considers political prisoners.
The United States on June 18 called on Russia to release dozens of people it says have been identified by rights groups as political prisoners, including Sentsov.
Russian state-run RIA Novosti news agency quoted Moskalkova as saying that Sentsov was "receiving nutrition from a drip filled with all the vitamins twice a day" and that he had not lost weight.
Separately, Sentsov's lawyers said the European Court of Human Rights had called on Sentsov to end his hunger strike and for Russia to provide details by June 27 about his condition and how his rights are being ensured.
With reporting by AP, AFP, and Interfax